Dr. Al Turovlin

Dr. Al Turovlin
DBA Alumnus
Operational and Information Technology Consultant, Al Turovlin Consulting

Background

Mr. Turovlin currently focuses his efforts on improving the operations of private equity portfolio companies. Mr. Turovlin has served as Chief Transformation Officer for Canon EMEA, CIO for Carl Icahn’s public and private portfolio companies, Partner/Managing Director for KPMG Consulting/Bearing Point, and has held senior leadership roles with Oracle and many start-up software companies. Mr. Turovlin holds a Master's of Accounting and a Master's of Public Administration in Public Financial Management, both from The American University. Mr. Turovlin also holds a B.S. in Finance & Management degree from Virginia Tech. He is a Certified Public Accountant and has earned a Certificate in Cyber Security from the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute and National Association of Corporate Directors. Mr. Turovlin likes bicycling in his spare time and hopes to one day complete a Century (100 miles in a day!). Mr. Turovlin saw the attainment of a DBA as the next step in his career and it will allow him to combine practice with theory.

Research Interest

Mr. Turovlin’s research interest is in Business Information Systems, specifically how technology can affect change in the corporate organization and how to quantify and/or qualify the benefits. Every five to seven years, technology enters a new generation. The latest generational change is the move to the cloud. The cloud is as significant a change for the corporate enterprise as the internet was for the consumer. Corporate managers need tools to understand, derive, and develop plans for the future. These tools should be broader than just ROI. They should be a set of quantitative and qualitative measurements that can measure the potential impact of migrating to the cloud. They should take into account the impact on process improvements, quality of information, responsiveness to business change, and organizational change.

Dissertation

Does Increased Information Technology Capability Increase the Business Value of Information Technology?